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Grontmij signing to design second-generation bio-methane Factory in Hardenberg
    - Press Release - June 6, 2012

 

Grontmij6jun2012release
Firm to make ethanol from waste in Malta
    - TIMES OF MALTA.COM - April 6, 2011

Article: Firm to make ethanol from waste in Malta
Publication: Times of Malta
Link to article: Times of Malta
Author: unknown

 

Ethanol is to be produced from waste in Malta in a €435 million investment by a British firm, Bloomberg news service reported yesterday.

GeneSyst UK Ltd., part of Hudson, Ohio-based Genesyst Inc., is planning to invest in three waste-to-ethanol plants on the island, attracted by its strategic location and human resources.

The first plant will employ 140 people from Malta. It will produce 90 million litres of ethanol from around 260,000 tonnes of non-food based biomass including sea-weed “washed up on Malta’s pristine bathing beaches”.

The ethanol can be blended with gasoline and used as transport fuel, Peter Hurrell, director at GeneSyst in England, was quoted as saying.

Design and construction of the first facility should start in the second half of this year and it is expected to start operating in 2013 to 2014.

GeneSyst’s second plant will be about twice the size of the first and should start working by 2014-2015.

The final project will be a “different format” to the previous two, said Mr Hurrell. It may be co-located in Gozo and Malta. “Malta was chosen by GeneSyst UK because it is strategically located for the wider development of the company in the general locale of the Mediterranean and beyond,” he told Bloomberg.

“Importantly, Malta has an excellent source of engineering technicians and apprentices with the skills needed to support the operations and maintenance needs of the first Malta biomass-to-ethanol facility.”

Genesyst plans $618 million waste-to-ethanol investment in Malta
    - BIOFUELS DIGEST- April 6, 2011

Article: Genesyst plans $618 million waste-to-ethanol investment in Malta
Publication: Biofuels Digest
Link to article: Biofuels Digest
Author: Meghan Sapp

 

In Malta, the UK subsidiary of Ohio-based Genesyst says it plans to invest $618 million in three waste-to-ethanol facilities on the island using predominantly imported waste. The first facility will produce 90 million liters annually and could be online as soon as 2013 while the second will be double the size and come online a year or two later. The third facility will be of a ‘different format’ than the first two.

Malta was chosen for its geographic location in proximity to Mediterranean markets and the UK as well as the abundance of engineering skills.

Genesyst Plans $618 Million Investment in Ethanol Plants on Malta Islands
    - BLOOMBERG.COM - April 5, 2011

Article: Genesyst Plans $618 Million Investment in Ethanol Plants on Malta Islands
Publication: Bloomberg.com
Link to article: Bloomberg.com
Author: Louise Downing

 

GeneSyst U.K. Ltd., part of Hudson, Ohio-based Genesyst Inc., is planning to invest 435 million euros ($618 million) in three waste-to-ethanol plants in Malta.

The first project will produce as much as 90 million liters of ethanol that can be blended with gasoline and used as transport fuel, Peter Hurrell, director at Wirral, northwest England-based GeneSyst, said today in an e-mail.

Design and construction of the first facility should start in the second half of this year, Hurrell said, and it’s expected to start operating in 2013 to 2014. It will cost almost 103 million euros.

GeneSyst’s second plant in the country will be about twice the size of the first, said Hurrell, with an investment of about 206 million euros. It should start working by 2014-2015, he said.

The final project in Malta will cost about 126.7 million euros and will be a “different format” to the previous two, said Hurrell. It may be co-located in Gozo and Malta, he said.

“Malta was chosen by GeneSyst U.K. because it is strategically located for the wider development of the company in the general locale of the Mediterranean and beyond,” said Hurrell.

“Importantly, Malta has an excellent source of engineering technicians and apprentices with the skills needed to support the operations and maintenance needs of the first Malta biomass- to-ethanol facility,” he said.

The facilities will use biomass derived from non-food sources to produce the clean fuel, said Hurrell.

The majority will be sourced from outside Malta, he said. GeneSyst is building two similar facilities in Yorkshire, northeast England. The first, costing about 82 million pounds ($133 million), should start producing ethanol by 2013 to 2014. The second, costing about 133 million pounds, should start working by 2014.

To contact the reporter responsible for this story: Louise Downing in London at Ldowning4@bloomberg.net

To contact the editor responsible for this story: Reed Landberg in London at landberg@bloomberg.net

American Jianye Greentech Holdings Finalizes Waste-to-Fuel Plant Design With Joint Venture Partner GeneSyst International
    - MSNBC.COM - March 30, 2011

Article: American Jianye Greentech Holdings Finalizes Waste-to-Fuel Plant Design With Joint Venture Partner GeneSyst International
Publication: MSNBC.com
Link to article: MSNBC.com
Author: www.globenewswire.com

 

GeneSyst U.K. Ltd., part of Hudson, Ohio-based Genesyst Inc., is planning to invest 435 million euros ($618 million) in three waste-to-ethanol plants in Malta.

The first project will produce as much as 90 million liters of ethanol that can be blended with gasoline and used as transport fuel, Peter Hurrell, director at Wirral, northwest England-based GeneSyst, said today in an e-mail.

Design and construction of the first facility should start in the second half of this year, Hurrell said, and it’s expected to start operating in 2013 to 2014. It will cost almost 103 million euros.

GeneSyst’s second plant in the country will be about twice the size of the first, said Hurrell, with an investment of about 206 million euros. It should start working by 2014-2015, he said.

The final project in Malta will cost about 126.7 million euros and will be a “different format” to the previous two, said Hurrell. It may be co-located in Gozo and Malta, he said.

“Malta was chosen by GeneSyst U.K. because it is strategically located for the wider development of the company in the general locale of the Mediterranean and beyond,” said Hurrell.

“Importantly, Malta has an excellent source of engineering technicians and apprentices with the skills needed to support the operations and maintenance needs of the first Malta biomass- to-ethanol facility,” he said.

The facilities will use biomass derived from non-food sources to produce the clean fuel, said Hurrell.

The majority will be sourced from outside Malta, he said. GeneSyst is building two similar facilities in Yorkshire, northeast England. The first, costing about 82 million pounds ($133 million), should start producing ethanol by 2013 to 2014. The second, costing about 133 million pounds, should start working by 2014.

To contact the reporter responsible for this story: Louise Downing in London at Ldowning4@bloomberg.net

To contact the editor responsible for this story: Reed Landberg in London at landberg@bloomberg.net

American Jianye Greentech Holdings Receives Construction Application Approval for 200,000 Metric Ton Waste-to-Fuel Conversion Plant
    - MSNBC.COM - March 9, 2011

Article: American Jianye Greentech Holdings Receives Construction Application Approval for 200,000 Metric Ton Waste-to-Fuel Conversion Plant
Publication: MSNBC.com
Link to article: MSNBC.com
Author: www.globenewswire.com

 

New Plant Estimated to Generate Incremental Annual Revenue of US$120 Million and Net Income of US$30 Million at Full Capacity

NEW YORK and HARBIN, China, March 9, 2011 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- American Jianye Greentech Holdings, Ltd. (OTCBB:AJGH), a leading developer, manufacturer and distributor of alcohol-based automobile fuel and civil-use fuel in China, today announced that AJGH has received approval from the XiangZhou government for its application to construct a waste-to-fuel plant to convert municipal solid waste, sewage sludge and construction waste to produce an estimated 200,000 metric tons of environmentally friendly, alcohol-based ethanol fuel per year. In conjunction with the approval, AJGH was allocated 183,333 square meters of industrial land for construction of the plant. AJGH will joint venture with USA-based GeneSyst International, Inc. to construct the waste-to-fuel plant.

AJGH notes that the waste-to-fuel plant is expected to be completed by the end of 2012 and commence commercial operations in early 2013 with estimated annual revenue of US$120 million and net income of US$30 million when operating at full capacity.

Mr. Haipeng Wang, Chairman and President, commented, "We are very excited to partner with GeneSyst International in constructing this state-of-the-art waste-to-fuel plant in XiangZhou. This follows our recent announcement to construct a similar facility in Harbin. This XiangZhou facility will be able to produce nearly twice the ethanol fuel as our Harbin facility and will help to further establish our leadership in this growing market. Moreover, by producing our own ethanol, we can lower the input costs for our blended fuels, which combine ethanol and petroleum fuel, along with our proprietary fuel catalyst. Our blended fuels are gaining widespread acceptance across China, and these waste-to-fuel plants will allow us to meet the growing demand. With the partial completion of our XiangZhou renewable fuel plant in early 2012, we expect to generate additional annual revenue of US$100 million and net income of US$10 million in 2012 alone."

About GeneSyst

GeneSyst is organized to take commercial advantage of a new proprietary technology to convert organic, toxic, hazardous and carcinogenic wastes of modern society into environmentally harmless substances or products. The company has secured exclusive rights to license a series of US and foreign patents authored or co-authored by its co-founder and chairman, James A. Titmas, an engineering professional with 52 years experience in engineering design and supervision, including water processing and wastes treatment across the US and the world.

For additional information, please visit: http://www.genesyst.com

About American Jianye Greentech Holdings

American Jianye Greentech Holdings, headquartered in Harbin, China, is a leading developer, manufacturer and distributor of alcohol-based fuel. The company's alcohol-based fuels burn with higher efficiency and significantly lower toxic waste emissions than unleaded gasoline. The unique combination of catalysts in the fuel enhance fuel octane rating and engine power, inhibit the premature oxidation of the fuel, help remove sediment in the carburetor, and prevent the erosion of the engine cylinder surface.

Additional information about the company is available at: www.americanjianyegroup.com .

This press release contains certain "forward-looking statements" relating to the business of the Company. These forward looking statements are often identified by the use of forward-looking terminology such as "believes," "expects" or similar expressions. Such forward looking statements involve known and unknown risks and uncertainties that may cause actual results to be materially different from those described herein as anticipated, believed, estimated or expected. Investors should not place undue reliance on these forward-looking statements, which speak only as of the date of this press release. The Company's actual results could differ materially from those anticipated in these forward-looking statements as a result of a variety of factors, including those discussed in the Company's periodic reports that are filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission and available on its website ( www.sec.gov ). All forward-looking statements attributable to the Company or to persons acting on its behalf are expressly qualified in their entirety by these factors other than as required under the securities laws. The Company does not assume a duty to update these forward-looking statements.

CONTACT: John Quirk

InvestorRoadshow.com

Tel: (516) 450-3119

© Copyright 2011, GlobeNewswire, Inc. All Rights Reserved

 

County tweaking trash-to-ethanol pact
- THE COALFIELD PROGRESS - August 10, 2009

Posted: Monday, August 10, 2009 11:49 pm

By: JODI DEAL / Staff Writer

WISE — County officials are still working on the language of a proposed agreement with a Bristol-based firm that wants to develop a plant here to turn trash into ethanol, according to County Administrator Shannon Scott.

Supervisors tabled an earlier incarnation of the agreement in July, expressing concerns that they didn’t have enough information to make an informed decision.

Later that month, representatives from Reclaimed Resources Inc. visited the county Industrial Development Authority to pitch the $150 million plant and left with the IDA’s endorsement, contingent upon evidence of financing for the project.

Although a memorandum of understanding with the company was on supervisors’ agenda for an Aug. 6 workshop meeting, they didn’t discuss it, nor was a new draft of the proposed agreement distributed.

After the meeting, Scott confirmed that the agreement is still being refined. Supervisors may have a draft in hand by their Thursday meeting, but may also choose to recess that meeting to late August to give themselves time to digest and consider the proposal, he noted.

The last incarnation of the agreement didn’t commit the county to any financial contribution to the project. Instead, it made clear that Wise County will only commit state or federal funds to the effort, and specified that that won’t happen until county officials have received “documental evidence” that RRI has secured financing for the project.

That draft also specified that RRI would be “exclusively responsible” for obtaining agreements with neighboring localities for solid waste to feed the plant. It also makes RRI responsible for finding somewhere to put the trash if the ethanol plant can’t take it.

County officials confirmed in July that representatives from RRI have mentioned that the company will need $250,000 at some point to carry out site exploration, such as engineering evaluations and core drillings.

Keep Wise County Beautiful representative Walter Crouse appeared at the Aug. 6 supervisors meeting, and noted that a resolution that organization had passed in support of the project had been delivered to the county.

“We need to move forward toward making Wise County the greenest county in Virginia,” Crouse said, noting that the proposal “would save the county big bucks” on the transportation and landfilling of trash.

ABOUT THE PROPOSAL

Reclaimed Resources head Ted Cox told supervisors in June that if the $150 million-plus plant is built, it could be the first of its kind in the country.

It would run on common household trash, and would need about 500 tons of fresh trash per day to keep operating. Although Wise County only produces about 100 tons, representatives from the company claim that more than 1,000 tons from neighboring localities and businesses already pass through the county each day on their way to other landfills.

Cox claims the plant could separate recyclable materials from trash that contains cellulose, which would be converted to ethanol, an additive in most gasoline, without producing any pollution. The plant would use technology patented by a company called Genesyst International Inc. to push waste though a pipe about 2,000 feet beneath the earth’s surface, where heat and pressure would break the waste down into sugars and nutrients which could be fermented into ethanol.

Metals, glass and plastics collected during the washing process would be recycled, he noted. Construction and demolition waste would still have to be landfilled.

IDA endorses trash-to-ethanol proposal
- THE COALFIELD PROGRESS - July 24, 2009

Posted: Tuesday, July 24, 2009 1:51 am

By: JODI DEAL / Staff Writer

WISE — The county Industrial Development Authority has gone on record supporting a proposal to build a plant to turn trash into ethanol somewhere in the county.

After hearing an hour-long presentation Tuesday by Ted Cox, head of the Bristol-based Reclaimed Resources Inc., the IDA voted to approve a resolution of support.

However, support is contingent upon evidence that permanent financing is in place for the $150 million plant, IDA Projects Coordinator Carl Snodgrass noted in a Wednesday telephone interview.

The IDA also agreed to help coordinate efforts to find a plant site.

Cox told the IDA that the plant will need about 50 acres, with room to expand by another 50 acres. He added that he’s already considering a site that has been strip mined.

Without the county Board of Supervisors’ support, Cox says he can’t enter the site to do preliminary engineering. And, he told the IDA, he can’t secure financing without a site and an official agreement with the county.

Cox said four groups of investors, based in Lynchburg, California, Australia and Switzerland, are interested in investing. “Each and every one of these investors has given us the same statement — it’s going to be extremely hard to work up investment proposals without a site and without a memorandum of understanding with the host community.”

When asked by Snodgrass to rank his confidence in the possible financing opportunities on a scale of 1-10, Cox replied, “about a seven, and I think by this time tomorrow, it’ll be up to an eight.”

COUNTY SUPPORT

County supervisors considered two drafts of a seven-page memorandum of understanding with the company in July, but postponed action until August.

Several supervisors said they had lingering questions, including how RRI plans to finance the plant.

County Administrator Shannon Scott told the IDA Tuesday that the plant “could be the biggest thing to come to Wise County since Dominion Energy and sliced bread.” He later added, “It deserves the attention of the IDA.”

He told RRI and the IDA that he hopes to see the board of supervisors adopt a memorandum of understanding “no later than Aug. 13,” and that meanwhile, county officials are crunching all kinds of numbers to get answers.

RRI needs the county’s help to access a potential plant site “so we can get this thing off first base,” Scott said.

Supervisors and the IDA have asked if Cox can show them a similar working plant.

“People say can we go see one — the answer is yes, but it’s no longer there,” Cox said. A similar facility was put together in Colorado to obtain U.S. patents, but was then dismantled and taken to the Netherlands, he added.

ABOUT THE PROPOSAL

Cox says if the $150 million-plus plant is built, it could be the first of its kind in the country.

It would run on common household trash, and would need about 500 tons per day. Although Wise County only produces about 100 tons, RRI claims that more than 1,000 tons from neighboring localities and businesses pass through the county each day on their way to other landfills.

Several neighboring localities are in multi-year contracts with companies that haul their trash to Johnson City, Bristol and Church Hill, Tenn. According to Cox, contracting with the Wise County plant would save those counties a lot of money, because the trash wouldn’t be transported as far.

Cox says the plant would separate recyclable materials from trash that contains cellulose, which would be converted to ethanol, an additive in most gasoline, without producing any pollution. The plant would use technology patented by Genesyst International Inc. to push waste though a pipe about 2,000 feet beneath the earth’s surface. Heat and pressure would break it down into sugars and nutrients which could be fermented into ethanol and a handful of other substances.

No trash would be stockpiled, Cox says, because it must be fresh to produce the optimum amount of ethanol. That’s why the plant couldn’t import trash from faraway locales, he added.

“We can’t imagine making Wise County a dumping ground for waste — we can’t imagine that,” Cox told the IDA.

Trucks would empty in an enclosed building, and the entire process would occur in a closed-loop system, Cox says. That means no trash would be piled outside, generating no odors or other hazards. He also says the conversion process creates “virtually no emissions,” and requires no special environmental permits.

The plant could also use sewage sludge, Cox has said.

Metals, glass and plastics collected during the washing process would be recycled, he noted. Construction and demolition waste would still have to be landfilled. The process will create a small amount of odorless, non-hazardous “inert material,” and 6,000 gallons of clean water per day, he says.

According to Cox, the project could create more than 300 jobs during construction and about 100 permanent operating jobs. Wise County’s solid waste stream will be reduced by 95 percent.

Wise County ponders ethanol plant pact
- THE COALFIELD PROGRESS - July 7, 2009

Posted: Tuesday, July 7, 2009 1:40 am

By: JODI DEAL / Staff Writer

WISE - The county Board of Supervisors is considering whether to go on record in support of putting a plant here that would turn trash into ethanol.

Thursday night, county Financial Administrator David Cox and County Attorney Karen Mullins handed out copies of a seven-page draft agreement that, if approved, will commit the county to helping the Bristol-based Reclaimed Resources Inc. plan for the facility.

The agreement doesn’t obligate the county to provide any money or land.

Under the agreement, both parties would agree to work together to study the feasibility of building the plant here and develop a timeframe for building it.

If supervisors agree, the document would commit the county to helping Reclaimed Resources find a location for the plant, figuring out how the site should be zoned and working with state and federal regulatory agencies to get the necessary permission to build it.

The county also would agree to try to help “identify potential public financing sources” for the project and “proactively support RRI in its efforts to secure financing.”

The company, meanwhile, would agree to continue “aggressive development and financing,” provide information to the county, state and federal government about the project and “cooperate with Wise County in the public discussion and presentation of the project to the end that it may be welcomed and accepted in the community.”

Mullins noted Thursday night that county officials are comfortable with the draft agreement, as are representatives for Reclaimed Resources.

Supervisors didn’t comment on the agreement Thursday night, and no representatives of Reclaimed Resources were present.

However, Donald Purdie of the Southwestern Virginia Technology Council urged supervisors to continue moving forward with the ethanol plant efforts.

“I think there’s a window of opportunity here, and it won’t be open forever. If we can keep moving on that, I know Ted Cox and company would appreciate it,” he said, referring to the president of Reclaimed Resources, who pitched the ethanol plant to supervisors in June.

Supervisors are expected to vote on the agreement when they meet Thursday at 6 p.m. in the board room of the county courthouse.

ABOUT THE PLANT

Ted Cox told supervisors in June that if the $150 million-plus plant is built, it could be the first of its kind in the country.

It would run on common household trash, and would need about 500 tons of fresh trash per day to keep operating. Although Wise County only produces about 100 tons, representatives from the company claim that more than 1,000 tons from neighboring localities and businesses already pass through the county each day on their way to other landfills.

Cox claims the plant could separate recyclable materials from trash that contains cellulose, and convert the cellulose to ethanol, an additive in most gasoline, without producing any pollution. The plant would use technology patented by a company called Genesyst International Inc. to push waste though a pipe about 2,000 feet beneath the earth’s surface, where heat and pressure would break the waste down into sugars and nutrients, which could be fermented into ethanol.

Metals, glass and plastics collected during the washing process would be recycled, he noted. Construction and demolition waste would still have to be landfilled.

Supervisors hear pitch for $200M trash-to-ethanol plant
- THE COALFIELD PROGRESS - June 12, 2009

Posted: Friday, June 12, 2009 2:25 am

WISE - The head of a Bristol-based company trying to build plants that turn trash into ethanol recently told Wise County supervisors he wants to build one here.

If supervisors agree to let them build the plant, which would be privately run and cost up to $200 million, it could be the first of its kind in the country, company representatives said.

“We are using a common feed stock to make a product being used by everyone in this room if you buy gas for your car,” said Ted Cox of Reclaimed Resources Inc. Common household trash contains material that could be converted to ethanol, which is added to most gasoline, without producing any pollution, he told county officials.

The federal government has mandated an increase in the production of ethanol to combat the country’s dependence on foreign oil, and will place a subsidy on ethanol produced using something other than corn, Cox noted.

The plant he’s pitching would require 45 acres of property, with access to utilities and rail service, and would take 18 to 24 months to build, according to Cox.

To keep running, the completed plant would need about 500 tons of fresh trash per day. Wise County produces only about 100 tons, but Cox says he’s found that, on any given day, about 1,500 tons of trash from neighboring localities and businesses already pass through Wise County on their way to other landfills.

“My friend, that is no longer garbage. It’s a commodity you can be proud to have in your community, to use as tax revenue and to create jobs for your citizens,” Cox told supervisors.

Cox noted that county ordinances that prohibit trash from outside the county from being imported are outdated and were written during an era when huge cities wanted to use places like Wise County to landfill their trash. This plant wouldn’t use waste from big cities because it wouldn’t be fresh enough by the time it was shipped here, Cox said.

Cox claims the plant would create about 100 permanent jobs when it’s finished, and could employ up to 350 construction workers while it’s being built.

HOW IT WORKS

According to Cox, the plant would use technology patented by a company called GeneSyst International Inc.

Anything that contains cellulose, from paper to cardboard to food waste, can be turned into ethanol, Cox says. And that doesn’t just include trash — animal waste, sewage sludge, wood and yard trimmings also would work.

In the plant, trash would be run through a series of washing systems that would separate out plastics, metals, glass and other materials that can’t be turned into ethanol while the material that can be used is ground up and broken down into a pulp that’s pushed into a pipe.

The pipe would go very deep into the earth — about 2,000 feet or so — and would harness the powers of gravity, pressure and friction to generate high temperatures, which break down the trash pulp into sugars and nutrients, which can then be fermented into ethanol.

Any impurities that make it into the pipe are turned into inert, harmless material that can be used as daily cover at the landfill, Cox claimed.

Metals, glass and plastics collected during the washing process would be recycled, he noted. Construction and demolition waste would still have to be landfilled.

J.H. Rivers of District Three pointed out that if built, the plant would eliminate the need for a $1 million recycling center the county has considered building.

WORK STILL TO DO

County Administrator Shannon Scott told supervisors that Wise County Industrial Development Authority Projects Coordinator Carl Snodgrass is working with Cox to pitch the proposal to state officials.

Cox noted that Snodgrass has already shown him a prospective site for the plant somewhere in Wise County.

In addition, Cox claims his plant would help Wise County extend public sewer service quickly and cheaply. Instead of installing lines to carry sewage to treatment plants, the county could install closed systems that emptied into holding tanks. From there, the waste could be brought to the ethanol plant for treatment.

If the county agrees to let Cox develop a plant here, Reclaimed Resources would first set up a lab on the site to test the local waste stream. The makeup of what would power the plant will factor into how it’s designed and how the chemical processes within it will work, he explained. Testing and training of employees would take about a year.

The plant can also generate clean water, according to Cox.

Scott said county officials will accompany Cox to Richmond this week to pitch the plan to state officials. County Finance Officer David Cox will be in charge of overseeing the project locally.

Agresti Vietnam to deploy gravity pressure vessel technology for low-cost ethanol from landfill waste
- Biofuels Digest - May 5, 2009

Agresti Vietnam to deploy gravity pressure vessel technology for low-cost ethanol from landfill waste

In Vietnam, Agresti Biofuel presented to more than 750 scientists, engineers, national and municipal governmental agencies on the issue of new waste treatment technology and alternative landfill solutions, after signing a Memorandum of Agreement with Phuc Yen Company and local businessman Mr. Ngo Xuan Tiec to market, build and operate municipal waste-to-ethanol facilities in the country.

The joint venture, Agresti Vietnam, will employ the patented GeneSyst Gravity Pressure Vessel technology to produce ethanol and other saleable products.

- story quoted from: Biofuels Digest - www.biofuelsdigest.com

Plans to poduce fuel from waste
- Yorkshire Evening Post, Leeds, England, - March 6, 2009
Bio-ethanolfabriek Kraakt Afval Ondergrounds
- Technisch Weekblad, Hardenberg, Netherlands - January 30, 2009

On the Web: Technlsch Weekblad Hardenberg, Netherlands

GeneSyst Ecotechnologies Recieves Award for Excellence
- MUNICIPALIKA 2009, Mumbai, India - Making Cities Work - January 29 - 31, 2009